Home >> Ethnobotany Plants: Part-O >> Oroxylum indicum (L.) Vent.

Oroxylum indicum (L.) Vent.

Synonyms: Bignonia indica L.

Group: Dicot
Family: Bigononiaceae
Duration: Perennial
Growth Habit: Tree

Bangla/Vernacular Name: Khona, Sona, Hona, Nasona, Patti, Dinga, Kanak, Kanaidinga, Bhinga (Mymensingh), Thona (Rema-Kalenga).

Tribal Name: Bailya, Khona gula, Krang-sia-bao, Taita (Chakma), Kering, Kharing (Garo), Egaroh, Kraat Saba,, Khron Sha mi,Krongsami(Marma), Khama (Mogh), Long Kock Sim (Murang), Thakurung,Thakhurung bathai (Tripura).

English Name: Indian trumpet flower.

Description of the Plant:

A small, glabrous, more or less unbranched, deciduous tree. Leaves very large, bi or tripinnate near the base, unipinnate at the apex; leaflets ovate-acuminate, turn coppery brown or purplish before shedding. Flowers numerous in large, erect racemes, corolla usually lurid-purple, reaching 10 cm long, fleshy. Fruit an oblong, flat capsule, 45-75 cm long, tapering towards both ends, woody when mature.

Chemical Constituents:

Bark and seeds contain a crystalline bitter substance, oroxylin. Bark also contains alkaloids, glucosides, baicalein, sitosterol and p-coumaric acid. Stem and root bark contain flavone-colouring matters like oroxylin-A, baicalein, chrysin, di-Me-terephthalate and 3-methoxy-6, 7-dihydroxyflavone. Ellagic acid and nine naphthalene related compounds have been isolated from the root bark. A number of phenylethanoids and cycloxylethanoids have been isolated from the fruits and presence of large number of flavonoids have been reported in the seeds.

Heartwood yield prunetin and ß-sitosterol (Ghani, 2003). Baicalein, its 6-glucuronide and 7-glucuronide, scutellarein, its 7-glucuronide have been isolated from leaves and stem bark. Stem bark also contains scutellarein-7-rutinoside (Rastogi and Mehrotra, 1993).

Mode of Uses:

  • Chakma use stem bark for jaundice and diabetes.
  • Extract prepared from root mixed with three drop water from three different ponds, taken two or three tea spoonful twice a day for three days for the treatment of impotence. Ash made of burnt fruits is taken for body pain and a root extract is taken for the treatment of dyspepsia (Marma). Marma also take root juice for body pain.
  • Root extract is taken in body pain and bark extract is used in jaundice (Murang).
  • Paste prepared from flower is taken one tea spoonful twice daily until cured to treat leucorrhoea and leucamia (Rakhaing).
  • The pods and flowers are cooked as vegetables. The flowers are stored after drying for future use (Bawm,Chakma, Marma,Rakhaing and Tripura).

Distribution:

Occurs in the forests of Chittagong, Chittagong Hill Tracts, Cox's Bazar, Dhaka-Tangail. Also found in village shrubberies and homestead throughout the country.

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